NIOSH Launches Framework to Combat Opioid Crisis

NIOSH’s new framework considers “the ‘lifecycle’ of opioid use from precursors in the workplace, to use conditions, to containment and decontamination, to strategic responses,” in order to provide recommendations for workers and employers to handle the opioid epidemic together, according to the framework materials.

The CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has developed a new framework that approaches the opioid crisis from a workplace perspective, examining different working conditions that can pose risk factors for medically prescribed opioid use becoming opioid misuse or abuse. NIOSH’s framework includes guidance for detection of opioids and effective, safe decontamination of workplaces.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, overdose deaths in the workplace from non-medical use of drugs or alcohol increased by at least 38 percent each year between 2013 and 2016. In addition, new analysis from the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report found that certain job groups, such as construction or extraction, may have a higher risk of death from opioids.

“The opioid epidemic reaches into every aspect of American life – including the workplace,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D. “CDC is working to understand the impact of different technologies to minimize risk and protect our nation’s workers and responders.”

NIOSH’s new framework considers “the ‘lifecycle’ of opioid use from precursors in the workplace, to use conditions, to containment and decontamination, to strategic responses,” in order to provide recommendations for workers and employers to handle the opioid epidemic together, according to the framework materials.

The framework is guided by four key focuses: identifying workplace conditions, determining work-related risk factors for opioid use and abuse, protecting workers and responders from opioid exposure, and developing methods for detection and decontamination. The agency provides resources for employers and workers as well.

“The opioid crisis is one of the most pressing public health challenges our nation faces today, and the workplace is not immune,” said NIOSH Director John Howard, M.D. “We are working with our partners to better understand what places workers at risk for opioid use and misuse, and identifying what research and information is needed to keep workers and first responders safe at work and in their communities.”

The NIOSH effort is part of the larger work of the CDC and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in combating the opioid crisis.

Download Center

HTML - No Current Item Deck
  • Incident investigation guide

    Need some tips for conducting an incident investigation at work after there’s been an occupational injury or illness, or maybe even a near miss? This guide presents a comprehensive overview of methods of performing incident investigations to lead you through your next steps.

  • Steps to Conduct a JSA

    We've put together a comprehensive step-by-step guide to help you perform a job safety analysis (JSA), which includes a pre-built, JSA checklist and template, steps of a JSA, list of potential job hazards, and an overview of hazard control hierarchy.

  • Levels of a Risk Matrix

    Risk matrices come in many different shapes and sizes. Understanding the components of a risk matrix will allow you and your organization to manage risk effectively.

  • Free Safety Management Software Demo

    IndustrySafe Safety Management Software helps organizations to improve safety by providing a comprehensive toolset of software modules to help businesses identify trouble spots; reduce claims, lost days, OSHA fines; and more.

  • Industry Safe
Bulwark FR Quiz

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - July August 2020

    July August 2020

    Featuring:

    • CONFINED SPACES
      Addressing Confined Spaces and Heat Stress Concerns
    • PROTECTIVE APPAREL
      Why Daily Wear FR Garments Make Sense No Matter the Season
    • HAND PROTECTION
      The Magic of New Technology
    • CHEMICAL SAFETY
      Why Effective Chemical Safety Training is More Important Than Ever
    View This Issue