OSHA Rolls Out Another Standards Improvement Measure

The agency's announcement said these proposed revisions would save employers an estimated $3.2 million per year and are based on responses to a public Request for Information issued in 2012 and recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health, OSHA's staff, and the Office of Management and Budget.

OSHA announced that, as part of its ongoing effort to revise parts of its standards that may be confusing, outdated, or unnecessary, it is proposing 18 changes to the recordkeeping, general industry, maritime, and construction standards. "The changes we propose will modernize OSHA standards, help employers better understand their responsibilities, increase compliance, and reduce compliance costs," Assistant Secretary Dr. David Michaels said. "Most importantly, these revisions will improve the safety and health protections afforded to workers across all industries."

The agency's announcement said these proposed revisions would save employers an estimated $3.2 million per year and are based on responses to a public Request for Information issued in 2012 and recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health, OSHA's staff, and the Office of Management and Budget.

This is the fourth rule proposed under OSHA's Standards Improvement Project, which began in 1995 in response to a presidential memorandum to improve government regulations. The previous changes were issued in 1998, 2005, and 2011.

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