Seattle Marine Terminal Operator Fined $448,200

Seattle Bulk Shipping Inc. is currently appealing violations for which it was fined $424,850 and is considered a severe violator by L&I, meaning it is subject to follow-up inspections to determine whether the conditions still exist.

The Washington state Department of Labor & Industries has imposed one of its largest fines in recent years, $448,200, against a marine terminal operator in Seattle after the company failed to correct serious worker health hazards for which it had been cited previously, L&I announced it July 28.

The agency's inspection at Seattle Bulk Shipping Inc.'s Harbor Island facility found the company did not correct serious violations for which it was cited last year. At the facility, highly flammable ethanol fuel is transferred from rail cars to tanker trucks and grain is loaded onto rail cars and transferred between trucks. The uncorrected violation was a confined space serious violation -- failing to develop an adequate confined space entry program to protect employees who work around or inside grain pits or other confined spaces. Failing to correct the violation carries a penalty of $324,000.

And the company was cited for a second violation that hadn't been corrected: failing to provide an approved emergency eyewash station for workers who transfer ethanol from rail cars and tanker trucks. Failure to correct this violation carries a penalty of $108,000.

And Seattle Bulk Shipping also was cited for three additional serious violations related to emergency procedures for potential ethanol release and confined space rescue, each with a $5,400 penalty.

The company is currently appealing violations for which it was fined $424,850 and is considered a severe violator by L&I, meaning it is subject to follow-up inspections to determine whether the conditions still exist. Seattle Bulk Shipping has 15 business days to appeal the new violations. Penalty money paid in connection with a citation is placed in the workers' compensation supplemental pension fund, which helps workers and families of those who have died on the job.

Download Center

  • Hand Safety Program

    Hand injuries are the #1 preventable industrial accident worldwide. In REThinking Hand Safety, the most comprehensive book on hand safety, you'll learn how top companies have reduced hand injuries by up to 90% and what the most successful hand safety programs have in common. Get your free copy today!

  • Free 1-on-1 Consultations

    Is your company ready to reduce hand injuries? Schedule a free meeting with a Superior Glove hand safety expert and learn how to reduce hand injuries, lower PPE costs, and increase worker productivity. Our 1-on-1 consultations offer personalized advice and recommendations for your specific needs and concerns.

  • Glove 101 Guide

    Choosing the right safety gloves for your workers can be a daunting task. That’s where some basic knowledge of gloves can really come in handy! In this comprehensive guide you’ll find key information you need to know about safety gloves from types of gloves and materials to additives, treatments, safety standards, and more.

  • Sample Program

    Find the right safety gloves for your team and try before you buy—in just 3 easy steps! Simply add the products you want to try to your sample box, complete the sample request form, and wait for your samples to arrive at no cost to you.

  • Water Protection Product Guide

    Find the right safety gloves for your workers that are designed to protect in wet environments. From light and flexible to heavy duty, find the best water-resistant gloves with mechanical protection to safeguard workers.

  • Superior Glove

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - November December 2022

    November December 2022

    Featuring:

    • IH: GAS DETECTION
      The Evolution of Gas Detection
    • OSHA TOP 10
      OSHA's Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards for FY 2022
    • FALL PROTECTION
      Enhance Your Fall Protection Program with Technology
    • 90TH ANNIVERSARY
      The Future: How Safety WIll Continue to Evolve
    View This Issue