Major U.S. Airlines Ban Hoverboards

American, United, and Delta all announced Dec. 10 that they are banning the devices from their aircraft, USA Today reported.

The three largest U.S. airlines, Delta, American, and United, all announced Dec. 10 that they will not allow hoverboards aboard their aircraft. Delta announced its decision on its website, saying it decided to ban them out of safety concern, "despite hoverboards' presence on many gift lists this holiday season."

USA Today reported United and American did the same on Dec. 10.

Delta's announcement said the airline is disallowing hoverboards and all lithium battery powered self-balancing personal transportation devices in carry-on and checked baggage effective Dec. 11. "Poorly labeled, powerful lithium-ion batteries powering hoverboards are the issue. Delta reviewed hoverboard product specifications and found that manufacturers do not consistently provide detail about the size or power of their lithium-ion batteries," it stated. "This investigation revealed devices often contain battery varieties above the government mandated 160 watt hour limit permitted aboard aircraft. While occurrences are uncommon, these batteries can spontaneously overheat and pose a fire hazard risk. In addition to the 160 watt hour or less requirement for lithium ion batteries, any spare batteries (or any battery not already installed into an electronic device) must be in carry-on baggage, and no more than two spares are allowed."

UK border authorities in Scotland have confiscated more than 15,000 hoverboards this month after assessing them and declaring them unsafe.

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