Oregon OSHA Accepting Applications for Training Grants

Any labor consortium, employer consortium, association, educational institution affiliated with a labor group, or other nonprofit organization may apply for up to $40,000 per grant project.

Oregon OSHA is now accepting applications for the development of innovative workplace safety and health training programs, and the agency said it encourages "unique projects such as mobile apps, videos, or online educational games to engage workers." Employers cannot use the program to fund training projects for their employees.

Any labor consortium, employer consortium, association, educational institution affiliated with a labor group, or other nonprofit organization may apply for up to $40,000 per grant project. The grants focus on programs that target a high hazard Oregon industry, such as construction or agriculture, or a specific work process to reduce or eliminate hazards. There is no requirement for matching dollars or in-kind contributions.

Grant applications are due Oct. 9, 2015. Examples of past grant projects are:

  • A bilingual training program for hazard identification
  • A video on Christmas tree harvest safety
  • An online training program to help workers comply with electrical standards
  • An educational program for nurses on preventing ergonomic injuries

The Oregon State Legislature established the grant program in 1990. Materials produced by grant recipients become the property of Oregon OSHA; they are available to the public from the Oregon OSHA Resource Center.

Grant application information is available at www.orosha.org/grant-programs.html.

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