Don't Miss Safety 2015's Monday Keynoter

In his famous TED Talk about which priorities are more important than global warming, with 1.14 million views so far, the Danish political scientist Bjorn Lomborg says we're prioritizing by default—bad idea.

ASSE's Safety 2015 expo started Sunday, but the core of the conference—the main educational program—really begins Monday, June 8. And attendees will be remiss if they miss Bjorn Lomborg's morning keynote Monday (7:40-9 a.m.), according to ASSE.

Clean water, sanitation, basic health care, and malnutrition can be solved worldwide for about half of the cost of solving global warming, he contends in a TED Talk with 1.14 million views thus far. So which priority should be ranked highest?

Like the Gates Foundation and others, solving malaria worldwide is a top global priority, he says in the Talk. Free trade also can pull millions around the world out of poverty, he says. "We can do a lot more by prevention," he says, echoing the basic message of OHS professionals everywhere.

Do we want to spend a lot of money in the future to solve problems for relatively few people, he asks, or do we spend "fairly little" now to solve problems for many people right now?

His Monday keynote is titled, "How to Make Your Efforts Count: Feeling Good vs. Doing Good." It should be a highly provocative and interesting talk, although possibly not as rapid-fire as his TED Talk.

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