66 Being Honored in L&I Worker Memorial Day Ceremony

Some worked in logging, construction, or fishing, which are acknowledged hazardous jobs, while others worked in insurance, research, or sales.

The Washington state Department of Labor & Industries' annual Worker Memorial Day ceremony next week will honor 66 people who died during last year from a job-related illness or injury, including a 22-year-old college student working as a commercial fisherman, a truck driver, a bridge painter, and an office manager working at her desk. The ceremony continues a 20-year tradition by the agency and will take place April 23. Parents, spouses, children, and other relatives have been invited to attend; the ceremony is open to the public.

Some of the 66 workers being honored were seniors in their 80s who died from diseases caused by workplace exposure to asbestos while they were in their prime working years, according to the department's news release. Some worked in logging, construction, or fishing, which are acknowledged hazardous jobs, while others worked in insurance, research, or sales.

"Worker Memorial Day is a somber reminder that there is still much work to do to make sure every worker in Washington returns home safely at the end of the day," said L&I Director Joel Sacks. "We honor those who died last year by pledging to do everything in our power to prevent these tragedies from being repeated."

The ceremony will begin at 2 p.m. at L&I's central building in Tumwater, Wash., and Gov. Jay Inslee is scheduled to attend, along with representatives of the Association of Washington Business, the Washington State Labor Council, and the Washington Self-Insurers Association.

For a list of those being honored, visit www.WorkerMemorialDay.Lni.wa.gov.

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