Bill Filed to Reform Federal Job Training

U.S. Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., who chairs the House Education and the Workforce Higher Education and Workforce Training Subcommittee, will chair a Feb. 26 hearing about her bill.

A newly filed bill named the Supporting Knowledge and Investing in Lifelong Skills Act is the vehicle Republicans on the U.S. House Education and the Workforce Committee appear ready to use to reform federal job training and employment assistance. It was filed Feb. 25 by U.S. Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., who chairs the committee's Higher Education and Workforce Training Subcommittee, and she will chair a Feb. 26 hearing about it.

"Today's workforce development system is failing workers, employers, and taxpayers," Foxx in a release posted on the committee's main website. "Instead of a dynamic network of employment support, we have a massive bureaucracy that stifles innovation and wastes resources. Last year, President Obama urged Congress to cut through the confusing maze of programs and create one program for individuals to access the assistance they need. The SKILLS Act is the only proposal that moves us toward this goal. It is time to be bold with how we prepare today’s workers to compete and succeed in this new economy."

Foxx and her Republican colleagues contend many of the more than 50 federal programs across nine agencies overlap. The original Workforce Investment Act of 1998 established a system of one-stop centers for individuals to access job training and employment services, but it has never been reauthorized, they point out. Committee Chairman John Kline, R-Minn., called Foxx's bill "a common-sense solution to help fix a broken job training system. We have tried the Washington-knows-best approach for decades, and it hasn't worked. In the process, we've squandered taxpayer dollars and failed to provide workers the help they need," he added.

The bill would eliminate some redundant programs and would create a Workforce Investment Fund to serve as a single source of support for employers, workers, and job seekers. It also would require state and local workforce investment leaders to outline how they’ll serve at-risk youths, individuals with disabilities, veterans, and other workers with unique challenges to employment, and it would require independent evaluations of programs at least once every five years.

Democrats on the committee already have introduced their own alternative, the Workforce Investment Act of 2013, which was introduced last week by Reps. John Tierney, D-Mass., Rubén Hinojosa, D-Texas, and George Miller, D-Calif. They say it would promote more effective coordination among local stakeholders, and they take issue with the Republicans' approach."“It is imperative we strengthen our workforce system so people of all ages and abilities can obtain the skills and training they need and so businesses can hire and grow. The bill we are introducing today does just that, and it will promote and expand the kind of innovative partnerships among colleges, businesses, and workforce boards that are occurring in my district and throughout the country. Some in Congress have unfortunately prioritized the arbitrary consolidation of workforce programs above all else. That's the wrong approach. Our bill will improve the effectiveness and increase the accountability of the workforce system, while still ensuring that those who need services can get it. I urge Chairman Kline and his colleagues to work with us and reauthorize the Workforce Investment Act in a bipartisan manner," Tierney said.

Hinojosa said the bill "creates a 21st century delivery system for adult education and workforce training that leads to career pathways, increased educational opportunities, civic participation and economic self-sufficiency for our nation's increasingly diverse workforce."

Download Center

HTML - No Current Item Deck
  • Get the Ultimate Guide to OSHA Recordkeeping

    OSHA’s Form 300A posting deadline is February 1! Are you prepared? To help answer your key recordkeeping questions, IndustrySafe put together this guide with critical compliance information.

  • Steps to Conduct a JSA

    We've put together a comprehensive step-by-step guide to help you perform a job safety analysis (JSA), which includes a pre-built, JSA checklist and template, steps of a JSA, list of potential job hazards, and an overview of hazard control hierarchy.

  • Everything You Need to Know about Incident investigations

    Need some tips for conducting an incident investigation at work after there’s been an occupational injury or illness, or maybe even a near miss? This guide presents a comprehensive overview of methods of performing incident investigations to lead you through your next steps.

  • Free Safety Management Software Demo

    IndustrySafe Safety Management Software helps organizations to improve safety by providing a comprehensive toolset of software modules to help businesses identify trouble spots; reduce claims, lost days, OSHA fines; and more.

  • Industry Safe

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - November December 2020

    November December 2020

    Featuring:

    • COLD STRESS
      Managing Cold Stress
    • TRAINING: FALL PROTECTION
      Providing Training for Fall Protection
    • PPE: HEARING PROTECTION
      Eight Tips for Hearing Testing Day
    • FACILITY SECURITY
      Incorporating COVID-19 Protections into Safety Programs
    View This Issue