Hydraulic Institute Closes '09 Releasing 3 New Standards

In what has been a banner year for new ANSI/HI Standard introductions, the Hydraulic Institute (HI) has announced the release of three new publications: Rotodynamic (Centrifugal) Pumps for Nomenclature and Definitions (ANSI/HI 1.1-1.2 – 2008), Rotodynamic (Centrifugal and Vertical) Pumps – Guideline for Condition Monitoring (ANSI/HI 9.6.5 - 2009), and the long-awaited Pump Piping for Rotodynamic Pumps (ANSI/HI 9.6.6 – 2009). The new standards are immediately available for interested users from the Hydraulic Institute's eStore.

Rotodynamic (Centrifugal) Pumps for Nomenclature and Definitions (ANSI/HI 1.1-1.2-2008) covers: overhead impeller, separately coupled pumps; between bearing, separately coupled, single stage pumps; between bearing, separately coupled multistage pumps; regenerative turbine pumps; and special effects pumps. Also included are descriptions of types, nomenclature, and definitions. Priced at $85, this new standard is designated by HI product code A101.

Rotodynamic (Centrifugal and Vertical) Pumps – Guideline for Condition Monitoring (ANSI/HI 9.6.5-2009) is designed to be used as a tool in implementing process safety management, and also for general pump availability improvement programs for centrifugal and vertical pumps, including both sealed and sealless pump designs. While the document does not require that monitoring be done, this new reference tool does provide information relevant to making such decisions, and offers suggestions for carrying out the monitoring process.

"This Standard has been thoroughly updated to include the latest instrumentation available to ensure long, uninterrupted pump operation," said Gregg Romanyshyn, HI technical director. "Valuable new information has been added, including details on how regular equipment monitoring can minimize the number of shutdowns." Ed Allis, special projects manager at Peerless Pump Co. and chairman of the HI Condition Monitoring Committee, added, "The Standard has been reviewed and enhanced to provide even more guidance to those who use pump condition monitoring in their process safety management system." The standard is $75 and designated by HI product code A122.

The third standard, Pump Piping for Rotodynamic Pumps (ANSI/HI 9.6.6-2009) was initially published a number of years ago as a two-page section within (ANSI/HI 9.8 – 1998) Pump Intake Design, but HI said the subject matter was deemed broad enough, and popular enough, to warrant a standalone publication. The expansive content covers: the effects and interactions of inlet (suction) and outlet (discharge) piping on rotodynamic pump performance; solutions for avoiding problematic situations resulting from poorly designed suction piping, poorly supported piping, unrestrained or inadequately restrained expansion joints, and uncompensated thermal expansion of the piping system; and more.

According to Tom Angle, PE, VP-Product Engineering at Weir Specialty Pumps and co-chair of HI's Pump Piping Committee, "This Standard is based on the combined knowledge and experiences of pump users, engineering consultants and manufacturer companies. During the 10+ years that this document was in process, over 125 individuals contributed their ideas and insights to the Committee. This has resulted in a Standard that has been thoroughly researched and analyzed, and achieves an unprecedented level of consensus throughout the pump industry." Purchase price is $125, and the HI product code is A127.

HI pump standards are widely accepted references designed for anyone involved in pumps, including users, consultants, contractors, construction firms, manufacturers of pumps, seals, motors, instrumentation, controls, and pump software developers and systems integrators. The three new standards, along with HI's complete library of ANSI Standards for the pump industry, are available in both electronic and print formats at the HI eStore at http://eStore.Pumps.org, or by calling the Hydraulic Institute's purchasing line at 973. 267. 9700, ext 118.

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

Featured Whitepaper

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - July August 2022

    July / August 2022

    Featuring:

    • CONFINED SPACES
      Specific PPE is Needed for Entry and Exit
    • HAZARD COMMUNICATION
      Three Quick Steps to Better HazCom Training
    • GAS DETECTION
      Building a Chemical Emergency Toolkit
    • RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
      The Last Line of Defense
    View This Issue