HHS Releases Action Plan to Prevent HAIs

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services unveiled its action plan on Monday to reduce and possibly eliminate health care-acquired infections (HAIs), which rank among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States. The plan says that CDC has estimated 1.7 million HAIs and 99,000 associated deaths occurred in 2002 alone. HAIs are estimated to cost nearly $20 billion in excess health costs annually, it states.

The plan includes seven five-year targets, one of which is a 50 percent reduction in the incidence rate for health care-associated MRSA infections. Soon the agency will announce dates and locations of public meetings about the plan. Comments on it should be sent by Feb. 6 to [email protected].

"This plan will serve as our roadmap on how the department addresses this important public health and patient safety issue," HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt said. "This collaborative interagency plan will help the nation build a safer, more affordable health care system."

Along with MRSA, the targeted areas are central line-associated bloodstream infections, a 30 percent reduction in the case rate of Clostridium difficile infections, a 25 percent reduction in catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and a lower rate of surgical site infections with 95 percent adherence rates for Surgical Care Improvement Project/National Quality Forum infection process measures. To read the entire plan and for hearing details, visit this site.

The plan says resource allocation and workforce development challenges remain, and new methods must be developed for collecting and evaluating data on HAIs. "National efforts to both measure and improve antimicrobial use are needed. These efforts should have a major impact on prevention efforts," it says.

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

Featured Whitepaper

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - May 2022

    May 2022

    Featuring:

    • WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY
      How Wearable Technology is Transforming Safety and the Industrial Workplace
    • TRAINING: CONFINED SPACES
      Five Tips to Improve Safety in Confined Spaces
    • INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE
      Monitor for Asbestos to Help Save Lives
    • PPE: FALL PROTECTION
      Fall Protection Can Be Surprising
    View This Issue