Survey: 85 Percent of Americans Feel AED Inadequacy in Emergency

Most Americans don’t believe they could perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use an automated external defibrillator (AED) to help save a life in a cardiac emergency, according to a recent American Heart Association survey.

In an online survey of more than 1,100 adults, 89 percent said they were willing and able to do something to help if they witnessed a medical emergency. Yet only 21 percent were confident they could perform CPR, and only 15 percent believed they could use an AED in an emergency. More than half of those surveyed didn’t recognize an AED in a typical setting. Survey respondents reported lack of confidence, concern about legal consequences, and fear of hurting a victim as reasons they would not take action in a cardiac emergency.

AHA released the survey results as part of the inaugural National CPR/AED Awareness Week, which began June 1 and ends June 7. The intent of the week is to encourage the public to get CPR training and learn how to use an AED to reduce death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest.

Other results from the survey include:

  • Sixty-five percent said they had received CPR training, but only 18 percent reported having received AED training.
  • Two-thirds of those trained in using CPR and AEDs were required to for their jobs, school, or the military.
  • Respondents’ reasons for not getting trained included not thinking about it or not being required.
  • Most respondents (89 percent) believe that providers of adult day care should be trained in using CPR and AEDs. Most (86 percent) also want training for child care workers.
  • The majority (88 percent) of people surveyed support requiring schools to have emergency plans, and 65 percent want public places to have AEDs on site.

For more information about the survey results and National CPR/AED Awareness Week, visit www.americanheart.org/CPR&AEDweek.

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  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - May 2021

    May 2021

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