Toyota Teen Driving Safety Program Resumes April 4-6

Noting that teenage drivers are involved in fatal traffic accidents twice as frequently as the rest of the U.S. population, Toyota announced its hands-on teen and parent advanced driving skills program "Toyota Driving Expectations" will resume April 4-6 at Charlotte Knights Stadium,in Fort Mill, S.C. Other appearances will follow for at racetracks in April and May.

Free classes go beyond what is taught in typical driver training classes, the company says, by putting teens behind the wheel to face real-world scenarios under the supervision of professional drivers. The program's curriculum addresses the fact that the best safety features in any moving vehicle are the mind and hands of the driver, according to the company.

"Toyota is committed to safe driving and equipping teens with the tools and confidence they need to become better drivers," said Michael Rouse, Toyota's corporate manager of national philanthropy and community affairs. "Since the program's debut in 2004, Toyota Driving Expectations has touched the lives of more than 7,500 teens and parents, creating an open dialogue within families to develop and maintain safe driving habits."

Teens practice driving despite distractions, and parents also drive a distraction course. The National Safety Council has been involved with the program since its inception. The other locations announced so far are Atlanta Motor Speedway (Atlanta, Ga.), April 11–13 and 18–20; Suffolk Downs (East Boston, Mass.), April 25–27; and Belmont Park Race Track (Elmont, N.Y.), May 2–4. For information, visit www.toyotadrivingexpectations.com.

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